REDLINE BICYCLES

REDLINE BIKES

Redline has come out with a couple of new item that the BMX and Dirt Jump set will love.
Let’s start with the new PL-26 that looks like an oversize BMX cruiser. The PL-26 has that old school BMX heritage put into it that Redline is known for. If you want that full sized BMX feel this is the one for you, built with a full chromoly frame, machined BB. The fork is made with the same material and the frame and multi butted with tapered legs, Integrated headset 1 1/8, RL Aluminum HollowPoint 55mm stem, with Chromo bars.
You have the old school type pinch bolt crankset with retro sticker and Bear Cage pedals. Very cool indeed.

PL-26

REDLINE PL-26 CRUISER
REDLINE PL-26 CRUISER

 

BMX COCKPIT OF OLD
BMX COCKPIT OF OLD

 

CHROMO PINCHBOLT CRANKSET
CHROMO PINCHBOLT CRANKSET

 

THE PL-26 COME WITH RL CHAIN TENSIONERS
THE PL-26 COME WITH RL CHAIN TENSIONERS

You can pick up the PL-26 for a cool $650.00

NEW REDLINE D26

The new D26 is all Dirtjump. Made with full 4130 Chromoly with mid BB and integrated headtube. The front fork is a Manitou Circus Comp 26″with 100mm of travel and thru axle. Gravity Components for the cockpit, and a Avid rear disc.

D26 DIRTJUMP
D26 DIRTJUMP

 

REDLINE CRANKSET AND PEDALS
REDLINE CRANKSET AND PEDALS

 

AVID REAR DISC
AVID REAR DISC

 

GRAVITY STEM AND BARS
GRAVITY STEM AND BARS

OLD SCHOOL REDLINE BMX

Here is a look at one of Redline’s museum BMX bikes from way back.

OLD SCHOOL BMX REDLINE PL-24
OLD SCHOOL BMX
REDLINE PL-24

 

GOTTA LOVE ANO
GOTTA LOVE ANO

REDLINE’S NEW D880 & D860 and Hardtail D680 29er’s

NEW AND COOL
Redline is well known for their exploits in Cyclecross and they are know stranger to cross country bikes by no means.
Their latest is the new 29″ D880, the flagship in the line with the D860 below the D880. These two are their full suspension models, fallowed with the D680 carbon Hardtail.

As you can see the D880 is Fox equipped with Kashima coat fork and shock, Sram 1x drivetrain, Crankbrother conponents.

Here you have the Redline’s 29 hardtail equipped with Fox, Sram, and Crankbrothers. The D860 in the background. The D860 come with Rock Shox suspension and Shimano equipped 2x drivetrain, and Crankbrothers components.

The pricing is not bad for what you get speced on the bikes. Prices are $3749 for the D880, $2749 for the D860 and $3999 for the D680
Look for these hot numbers at a dealer near you or contact Redline at Redline.com

Product Review: WTB Freedom Cruz 29er tires

A few months ago, I turned one of my mountain bikes into a commuter.

Yeah, I know. It’s kinda embarrassing. But I had a bike available, and WTB sent over their Freedom Cruz 29er tires for review, so I felt obligated.

For the full review, head on over to BikeCommuters.com – but in short, these did the job and more, and I actually got to appreciate an old bike in a different context (and fixed a couple of nagging issues along the way, since I had lots of time to appreciate the problems!). If you’ve got a bike gathering dust in your basement, garage, or storage area, the Freedom Cruz tires are worth the investment!

Redline Flight Gloves: Review Initiated

Our friends sent us some great Redline Bicycles products to review, one of them is the R550 Road bike that Moe is reviewing for BikeCommuters.com. The other is this sweet set of gloves. Meet the Redline Flight Gloves. Priscilla will be testing these puppies out. I actually prefer it that way since everyone will know that she’s my lady since her hands will adorn my name.

Here’s the specs courtesy of Fat BMX Mag:

Never one to be satisfied with perfection, Redline has again improved upon their popular FLIGHT glove – and there’s more to it than just a change of color. The new Redline Fight Glove in WHITE and black is being ridden by National, US and World Champions, along with Olympic hopefuls. Here are the new features:
· New, shorter closure strap.
· Full “RL? pattern, screened in silicon throughout the Amara palm

– for extra grippage.
· Easy-to-pull Tab at wrist with silicon grippers.
· Pre-curved articulated fingers with vented nylon mesh backing.
· Full thumb Terry cloth wipe.
· Woven nylon backing material.
· Super strong cross-point finger tips.
· Custom molded rubber-armor knuckle guards.
· Eight sizes available ranging from Youth X-small to adult X-large.

This thing is sweet…look at it, it’s got my name ALL OVER it!

Big “RL” on the gloves indicate my mark on Priscilla.

Pivot 429 Ride Impressions

I got a chance to take the Pivot 429 out on a quick haul through the Sea Otter Demo XC demo course. I was out there for less than an hour so this is definitely not a full on review of the Pivot 429 but more of a couple of impressions I got from the short ride.

When I hopped on the 429 and started pedaling, I instantly noticed that this bike has an almost hardtail-ish racy feel. I attribute this to a very solid/stiff rear that transfers power down without any wasted flex. There was no noodley feeling from the rear that I occasionally get with other fs 29ers. This suspension seems to be on the firm side rather than ultra plush. I personally prefer this setup as it suits my riding style to a “t”.

The demo trail at Sea Otter is not extremely technical but it does have a couple of short climbs one being particularly steep and a couple of uphill grinders. It also has some nice flowy singletrack with stutter bumps, small XC-ish jumps and, on this weekend, sand. On all the climbs around the demo course the 429 to performed very well. Standing and seated climbs were easy and the rear suspension never felt like it got in the way. I was particularly happy with the way the 429 climbed a steep section as the rear felt planted and the cockpit felt comfortable enough to change from a seated position to a standing position and back to a seated position without losing balance or being awkward.

The steering feel of the Pivot is neutral. Not fast like the Gary Fisher G2 geometry but not slow either. The bottom bracket height is almost a full inch taller than my Redline but this did not impede handling, nor did it make me feel like I had too high a center of gravity. I still felt comfortable carving the singletrack at SO although the tires did not give me confidence to rip any of the jumps. The stutter bumps were muted by the suspension but did not disappear entirely as the suspension is more firm than plush.

Overall the 429 is a very fun racy bike that fits my type of riding entirely. I would probably go with a tire with a bit more grip both front & rear if I were to ride this but I could see the Kenda Small Block 8 on the rear being used for races.

Click here for pictures of the Pivot 429 prototype seen at Sea Otter 2008.

Click here for the video of Chris Cocalis discussing the Pivot 429.

Click here for Pivot’s website.

Quick Survey… 29ers at your LBS?

I recently went out to four nearby Local Bike Shops (LBS) to check out the 29er scene. I was particularly interested in what manufacturers the LBS carried and if the LBS carried 29ers from those manufacturers.


Specialized FSR 29

My realization? 29ers have definitely come a long way in a short period of time. Every shop I went to had at least one 29er on their sales floor. This probably would not have been the case just a year ago. The popularity of 29ers has caught the attention of many big name manufacturers and because of this many of them have added their own 29er for their lineup.

The first shop I visited is a high end bike shop. They carry smaller bike brands like Salsa & Felt. At this shop 29ers were very commonplace and the sales people were very familiar with 29ers. They consistently recommended them for mountain biking to many of their customers. I came away pretty stoked because the 29ers were holding their own at the shop.

The next shop I visited was significantly larger. It had a ton of bikes from different manufacturers and 29ers were still well represented there. The 29ers they had were by Redline and Specialized. Only a short year ago this shop wasn’t even carrying any 29ers. Why? Because they didn’t carry Redline bikes and Specialized was still dragging its feet in coming out with their 29ers. Now Specialized got on board and added a hard tail plus a full suspension 29er to their lineup. The shop, likewise, did the same to their sales floor. Redline had a strong showing here multiple Mono 9’s, Monocogs & Monocog Flights.

The 3rd shop on my list was a Trek/Gary Fisher dealer. I knew this bike shop would be filled with 29ers but I was surprised when I walked in and only a few 29ers were on their sales floor. I inquired about this and was told that their supply couldn’t keep up with the demand for 29ers and the 29ers were flying off the floor as soon as they were built!


Moe & his KHS Solo-One

The last bike shop I visited is a little shop that I’ve been frequenting off and on for the last few months. For mountain bikes they carry Santa Cruz, KHS, Cannondale and Trek. Although half of those manufacturers carry 29ers the LBS had only one 29er on the floor, a lonesome KHS Solo-One (not kidding… a “solo” “one”). I was a little bummed that this shop didn’t have more 29ers especially from KHS who has wholeheartedly supported the 29er movement with rigid, hardtail and recently full suspension 29ers. When I inquired as to why they stocked only one 29er the owner mentioned that he had not ridden a 29er yet. Ahhh… I get it now. In my opinion you really can’t realize the benefits of the 29er unless you’ve had some seat time. His reasoning for carrying the Solo-One is that if any of his customers were interested in trying a 29er the cost would not be prohibitive to get onto one. Valid point.

So, are 29ers coming around? In my neck of the woods I would have to answer with a resounding “yes?. All of the LBS’s I visited carried at least one 29er and many of them had 29ers from different manufacturers. For some of these LBS’s the 29ers were a strong part of their bottom line. Music to my ears!

What about for you? Have you started to see more 29ers out on the trails and in your LBS?