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Airborne Goblin: First Impressions

Posted by Dan Burdett On May - 20 - 2011

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I’ve managed to get a couple of rides in on the Goblin now, and can give some preliminary feedback on it. Here is Airborne’s take on what they intended the bike to be.

The Goblin is built to compete head-to-head with a couple of bikes we really respect: Trek’s base X-Caliber, and the Specialized RockHopper Pro 29er series. The Goblin’s geometry is nimble enough to pick singletrack lines, but plenty stable for hi-speed descents. And although the larger wheels let you roll over stuff you’d avoid on a 26er, the front end is very precise, even while climbing. Hydroformed and hand-welded 6061 alloy frame with a full SRAM X7 2×10 drivetrain.

I would have to say they they were successful in balancing the geometry for nimbleness on single-track with down-hill stability. At uber-high speeds it can get a little squirrelly, but that’s the nature of a hard-tail with skinnier tires. For better or worse depending on your preference, it does tend to have a point & shoot characteristic. Get it pointed in the direction you want to go and you will get there. The goblin is definitely not weight-weenie race bike light, but you get a lot of bike for the price-point. It is a very stiff frame, and does not give back too much on the chatter for the stiffness. The weight came out to just over 28lbs as shown in the pic below with pedals and bottle cages.

Weight with pedals & cages.

Weight with pedals & cages.

I would assume partly because the of higher weight this frame likes to stay on the ground. It wasn’t light enough to throw around and flick off every little drop and turn, but liked to roll off things and keep a more consistent line. The longer stock stem ended up being a bit much for me and I switched it out to a 90mm one. And what a difference that made! Previously to the switch I felt my weight was too far over the front wheel, but the shorter stem fixed that problem. The handling on the Goblin is quick and reasonably agile, but not twitchy. Overall it left me with a just stable enough feeling. The down-tube is nicely hydro-formed and has an interesting joint to the BB getting very flat and wide. The paint has held up well so far, and is without complaint. Much better actually than my other 29er HT.

Logo'd up Goblin downtube.

Logo'd up Goblin downtube.

The frame is reasonable stiff and and didn’t notice any significant flex. It is also fairly forgiving for being aluminum. While I didn’t feel overly rattled to death by trail chatter, It’s still an aluminum hard-tail and has the limits of such. One thing I do not quite understand it the larger diameter seat-post (30.6, I believe). It is my understanding that for HT’s the smaller diameter seat-tube is preferable for designed “flex” or give and yields a smoother ride, while the for AM bikes need to larger diameter for stiffness. I don’t think I could handle an all day epic without at least making a change to the saddle.

2x10 cranks

2x10 cranks

With a retail price of $1,200.00 the Goblin comes well equipped with a good spec for the price, and leading that charge is a 2×10 drive-train from with SRAM X.7 parts and AVID brakes, and supported a Reba 80mm fork. Every time I ride the new 2×10 platform, it just confirms that I would never invest in a three-ring cranks again. I am totally of fan and sold on the the 2×10.

Avid Elixir Brakes.

Avid Elixir Brakes.

The Avid brakes took a few miles to bed in, and I am told this is normal for this line. Once they were bedded they preformed admirably and had a few good feel. Both front and rear rotors are 160mm. I’ve been told this is not usually enough for the front wheel on a 29er, but I have yet to have any issues.

X7 Front derailluer

X7 Front derailluer

Reba RL & Small block 8.

Reba RL & Small block 8.

The small block 8′s from Kenda are performing great and only start to fall apart in loose trail conditions.

WTB Trail 29 wheels.

WTB Trail 29 wheels.

Come race day, probably the only modification I’m going to make is just to put on some lighter wheels. But you have to keep costs in mind here as well in that the wheels I’m planning to use also are about the same price as the entire Goblin build. It’s a good thing I don’t have a full blown case of upgradeitis…

Quanta Hubs

Quanta Hubs

San Marco Saddle

San Marco Saddle

Headtube w/ Airborne Logo

Headtube w/ Airborne Logo

Airborne Goblin.

Airborne Goblin.

Summary: The Goblin has a great build for the price with solid components. It is not race light, but on the other hand it never claims that as a goal. My only suggestion for Airborne on how to improve it is just to find ways to shave some weight off the frame. The geometry and handling feels good and with this as a starting point Airborne can only improve on what it already has. I look forward to getting more trail time on the Goblin and pushing this bike to its limits.

3 Responses to “Airborne Goblin: First Impressions”

  1. Jeremy Yang says:

    Thanks for the impressions. The Goblin’s Go Fast Green is fitting since you’ll be racing it soon. Good luck.

  2. Jeremy Mudd says:

    Contrary to what the reviewer states above, it is not the trend nowadays to use small seat-tubes on hardtail mtb’s. The 31.6mm post on the Goblin is about the avarage industry norm in regards to mtb post size. Aftermarket posts in carbon and alu are readily available in that size.

    Regarding the weight this bike is not heavy for a $1200 bike as spec’d. That being said, the majority of the extra weight can be found in the wheels and tires. A wheel swap and a few other changes can get this bike down to sub 25lbs fairly easily…………if that is what one is after. Frankly there isn’t any way that Airborne can really take anymore weight out of the 6061 Aluminum frame. It has butted main tubes. We could go to a carbon frame…………..but it won’t be $1200 anymore!

    Thanks,

    Jeremy

  3. [...] This past Saturday Animal showed up to our ride at Whiting Ranch. He rolls up and tells us he had just finished a lap and was looking to add more miles that morning. One of our other buddies J-Kewl joined us for this ride. By the way, all the photos were courtesy of Lady P and Animal. Animal tells us about a section of Whiting Ranch that not many riders dare to climb. In fact while we were there we only saw one other guy on a bike. Check out the this photo that Lady P took of Animal, J-Kewl and yours truly. She was pretty fierce that day and was mashing up all the climbs. Here’s one of the look out points that Lady P found. Click on the image to make it bigger. Once we got to the top we were greeted with a picnic bench where we could relax and take in the scenery. Animal was riding his Airborne Goblin. [...]

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